Português | English

 

...........................................................................CICLO DE CONFERÊNCIAS.................................................................

 

November to February
18h00 | Auditorium 2 of Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation
Free entrance


PROGRAMME
Live broadcast video: http://live.fccn.pt/fcg

November 17, 2010
'Taking it on Trust' in images of Nature
Martin Kemp

Abstract: Images in the natural sciences exploit visual rhetorics (invented in art to some extent) to put us in the position of a virtual witness, to convince us of the reality of the image, or are used to assert the irrefutable precision of the visual data. They also play into the social settings for the production and marketing of the books in which they appear. The examples will extend from the Renaissance to the present day. Then as now we take a good deal "on trust" when accepting the veracity of a representation.

.............................................................................................................................................................................................


December 15, 2010
The Problem of a Picture of an Atom
Christopher Toumey

Abstract:
Nanotechnology earns much of its credibility by producing detailed and attractive pictures of atoms, molecules, and other nanoscale objects.  But these pictures are not like photographs.  With a photograph, one can compare a photo of an object with the object itself to see whether the photo is a faithful image of the object.  But nano images are visual interpretations of electronic data, and they typically include a series of artificial enhancements.  This means that a picture of an atom or a molecule is not a faithful image of the atom or the molecule.  After introducing that problem, this presentation will trace the history of electronic microscopy leading up to the current status of nano images.  Then, to explore how we might get the most benefit from visual knowledge contained in nano images, I review certain principles from early Cubist theory.  We can apply those principles to nano images: instead of abandoning problematic nano images, we can better understand pictures of nanoscale objects by viewing them the way the early Cubists viewed the objects they painted.

.............................................................................................................................................................................................


January 19, 2011
Visiting Time: The Renegotiation of Time through Time-Based Art
Boris Groys

Abstract:
In our culture, we have two different models that allow us to synchronize, the time of contemplation and the time of the artwork itself: immobilization of the artwork or immobilization of the spectator. The immobilization of the image in the art exhibition space, of the text in the book, of texts and images on the computer screen - or the immobilization of the spectator in the theater, movie theater, concert hall, in front of the TV screen etc. Both models, however, fail in a case of the so-called time-based art, e.g. when the moving images are transferred into the art exhibition space (museum, Kunsthalle etc.). In this case, the images keep moving —but the spectators also keep moving. It is obvious that this causes a situation in which the contradictory expectations of a visit to a movie theater and a visit to a museum conflict—sending the visitor to a video installation into a state of doubt and helplessness. The time begins to be newly experienced, conceptulized and thematized. Through the re-negotiation of the relationship between time of contemplation and time of contemplated process.

.............................................................................................................................................................................................


February 2, 2011
Functional Images of the Brain: Beauty, Bounty, and Beyond
Judy Illes


Abstract: Few disciplines bring about fundamental changes as rapidly as science and medicine. This lecture will focus on the ever increasing possibilities to acquire signatures of the self - from genes to whole brain - using functional brain imaging and other modern neurotechnology. What are the implications of new advances for understanding people as biological beings, for brain well-being, and for society? The answers to such questions lie in the delicate balance between knowledge, autonomy, values, and privacy.

.............................................................................................................................................................................................

Informações | Estabelecimentos de ensino interessados em participar:
Serviço de Ciência
Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian
Av. de Berna 45A – 1067-001 LISBOA
T. +351217823525 | E. randrade@gulbenkian.pt


.............................................................................................................................................................................................

Este colóquio integra-se nas Comemorações do
Centenário da Universidade de Lisboa e da Faculdade de Ciências



© 2008-2010 A Imagem na Ciência e na Arte · Todos os direitos reservados